1972 plymouth roadrunner superbird




1972 plymouth roadrunner superbird

Article Navigation:
  • Photo
  • RM Sotheby's - Plymouth Road Runner Superbird | Arizona
  • Video
  • RELATED PAGES
  • Dissatisfied with the performance of the Road Runner, Petty Engineering had asked the Chrysler managers for Dodge.

    Conceived for NASCAR racing, the Superbird was a follow-up project from Dodge's Charger Daytona of , one of the so-called “aero cars” competing that.

    Classics on Autotrader has listings for new and used Plymouth Superbird Classics for sale near you. See prices, photos and find dealers near you.

    1972 plymouth roadrunner superbird

    1972 plymouth roadrunner superbird

    The was marketed as the " Road Runner" engine. If you have a later model, like a Plymouth Roadrunner, you can even find parts like air conditioning and FM radios specific to that year. It was an easy fix due to the fact that the mounting points for fenders on both cars were identical. This Superbird in B5 Blue with a white interior that claims to be an unrestored survivor with the original transmission, original rear end, and original fender tag.

    1972 plymouth roadrunner superbird

    1972 plymouth roadrunner superbird

    1972 plymouth roadrunner superbird

    1972 plymouth roadrunner superbird

    1972 plymouth roadrunner superbird

    Plymouth Road Runner Superbird: A Profile of a Muscle Car | HowStuffWorks

    The Plymouth Superbird was a highly modified, short-lived version of the Plymouth Road Runner with well-known graphics and horn sound. It was the factory's follow up stock car racing design, for the season, to the Dodge Charger Daytona of , and incorporated many engineering changes and modifications both minor and major garnered from the Daytona's season in competition. The car's primary rival was the Ford Torino Talladega , a direct response to the Mopar aero car.

    It has also been speculated that a motivating factor in the production of the car was to lure Richard Petty back to Plymouth. The Charger version that began the season was the first American car to be designed aerodynamically using a wind tunnel and computer analysis, and later was modified into the Daytona version with nose and tail. The Superbird's smoothed-out body and nosecone were further refined from that of the Daytona, and the street version's retractable headlights made of fiberglass [1] added nineteen inches to the Road Runner's original length.

    1972 plymouth roadrunner superbird

    The rear wing was mounted on tall vertical struts that put it into less disturbed air thus increasing the efficiency of the downdraft that it placed upon the car's rear axle. For nearly 30 years the mathematic formula used to determine the exact height of the enormous wing was thought to be a highly guarded Chrysler secret. In the s a retired Chrysler project engineer falsely [7] claimed publicly that the height was determined in much simpler fashion: By coincidence, the height of the wing was at the optimum level for maximum downforce.

    These cutouts were to allow wheel clearance due to the taller, wider wheels and lowered the height of the vehicle for NASCAR competition.

    1972 plymouth roadrunner superbird

    On Daytonas , the scoops were actually for ventilating trapped air from the wheel wells in order to reduce under fender air pressure and lift. For standard road going Superbirds the covers or "air extractors" were a cosmetic enhancement. NASCAR's homologation requirement demanded that vehicles to be raced must be available to the general public and sold through dealerships in specific minimum numbers. For , NASCAR raised the production requirement from examples to one for every two manufacturer's dealers in the United States; in the case of Plymouth, that meant having to build 1, Superbirds.

    Due to increasing emissions regulations, combined with insurance spike for high performance cars and NASCAR's effective ban on the aero cars, was its only production year. A smaller version of the decal appears on the driver's side headlight door. Superbirds had three engine options: Only models were fitted with the Hemi. As the was less expensive to produce, the "street" version of the Hemi engine used in competition was homologated by producing the minimum number required.

    On the street, the nose cone and wing were very distinctive, but the aerodynamic improvements hardly made a difference there or on the drag strip. In fact, the Road Runner was actually quicker in the quarter mile and standard acceleration tests due to the increased weight produced by the Superbird's nose and wing. Chrysler memos of September show that the sales programming staff were preparing to handle 1, winged Plymouths for , but published figures say as many as 2, were built.

    1972 plymouth roadrunner superbird

    The current figure generally accepted is 1, SuperBirds built and shipped to United States dealers, with anywhere from 34 to 47 allegedly heading to Canada. The engine option is also questioned, although the most frequently seen numbers report one-hundred thirty five ci. Hemi SuperBirds and seven-main-bearing sixteen ci. It is believed that over 1, Plymouth SuperBirds exist today. Charlie Grey, director of the Ford stock car program, felt that hiring Petty would send the message that "money rules none".

    However, the Superbird was designed specifically to lure Petty back to Plymouth for the season. Petty did reasonably well against strong Ford opposition on the NASCAR tracks that year, winning eight races and placing well in many more. While they were still legal to race, the power-to-weight consequences that would come with the smaller engine or the increased weight rendered the cars uncompetitive.

    134545 / 1970 Plymouth Road Runner Superbird



    • Подписаться по RSSRSS
    • Поделиться VkontakteVkontakte
    • Поделиться на FacebookFacebook
    • Твитнуть!Twitter

    Leave a Reply

    Return to Top ▲TOP ▲