Studebaker concept cars




Studebaker concept cars

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  • By the s Studebaker had seen the future and entered the car business in The first Studebaker cars were electrics, and then through.

    The s Studebaker concept cars were intriguing models that could have saved the company. But fast-falling demand for an aging group of cars and a.

    Custom built Studebaker convertible, Studebaker built one prototype convertible in but didn't ever put the convertible into production. The guy that.

    The concept car concept is translated as "the idea of a car". This is a kind of prototype car, which tests people's reactions to new technologies being introduced, design solutions, etc. In its original form, prototypes are never launched into mass production.

    Studebaker concept cars

    Studebaker concept cars

    What Studebaker needed far worse than a peripheral personal luxury coupe was a completely new core product line: Of course, you never dared stop. In the period , the Studebaker board, which was really the Packard board that got duped in the purchase of Studebaker…it was hedging its bets. Notify me of new posts by email.

    Studebaker concept cars

    Studebaker concept cars

    Studebaker concept cars

    Studebaker concept cars

    Studebaker concept cars

    s Studebaker Concept Cars Sceptre Series | HowStuffWorks

    Studebaker is an American automotive legend, and of the few manufacturers to successfully transition from the horse-drawn to the horsepower eras.

    Founded in , the company produced high quality wagons for farming and overland freight hauling. By Studebaker was the largest vehicle manufacturer in the world, producing wagons and carriages in a proto-assembly line that had no rivals.

    Studebaker concept cars

    The surprisingly nautical form with its curved floor wedged cargo in tight to prevent loads from shifting on rough terrain. By the s Studebaker had seen the future and entered the car business in , while still producing wagons until The first Studebaker cars were electrics, and then through partnerships the company produced internal combustion engines for their cars, and others.

    Studebaker would continue in business all the way through the s, as minor but steady player in the business. But its business practices were not as solid as its cars, and it would regularly alternate between good and bad years despite delivering quality cars that sported occasional brilliant design. By the s, Studebaker was slipping badly in the marketplace, despite superior styling by Raymond Loewy.

    Studebaker concept cars

    They were not alone. Hudson, Nash, Kaiser-Frazer and Crosley all sought mergers, consolidations or exited the business in the early and middle years of the decade.

    An ill-advised Studebaker merger with Packard in actually made things worse, confusing the brand images of the storied marques. Raymond Loewy was brought back to design a miracle car for Studebaker. He created a classic, but it was too late. By the s, the end was in sight. Even the dramatic Raymond Loewy-designed Avanti of could not pull the company out of a fiscal death spiral. Brooks Stevens-designed GT Hawk. Like Loewy, Stevens had a steady career of designing good products of all types dating back to the s.

    Although not as flamboyant as Loewy, Steven considered himself every bit the equal to the aristocratic Frenchman, and was determined to counter the Avanti with an entire lineup of cars that would rescue Studebaker. Stevens knew that even more than almost any American manufacturer, Studebaker depended on solid workaday sedans and coupes for the common buyer who looked for value and reliability in a car. Stevens would design a series of sedans, coupes and MPV-like vehicles for the future of Studebaker, with the target model year set at The car would be a replacement for the GT Hawk, be larger than the Avanti which was built on a compact Lark frame and be aimed more at the nascent Personal Luxury Car market.

    Studebaker concept cars

    Stevens and his staff worked at breakneck speed to craft a design for the Sceptre, as the car would come to be named. Then the design was sent across the Atlantic to Turin, to the Carrozzeria Sibona-Basano — a short-lived but highly-regarded coachbuilder which worked in a remarkable variety of body types, and with extremely high quality, for marques such as Abarth, Lamborghini and Simca, as well as for Virgil Exner and, of course, Brooks Stevens.

    Stevens had sent the Sceptre to Italy for a little Italian polish on the design, and for high-quality craftsmanship on the construction of the concept. He was not disappointed. And it was a dramatic, futuristic departure from the elegant, but aging, design of the Gran Turismo Hawk. A walk around the car reveals its innovative design. The side elevation shows a low hood and trunk with a high airy glasshouse in between.

    The Cars of Tomorrow



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