Pontiac aztek concept vs. production




Pontiac aztek concept vs. production

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  • Often, the appealing styling that attracts us to concept cars is lost by the time a production-ready vehicle is built.

    The Pontiac Aztek is a mid-size crossover marketed by General Motors from model years to , along with its corporate cousin, the Buick Rendezvous. As a 4-door crossover with a front engine and four-wheel drive, the Aztek featured a four-speed automatic transmission with a V-6 engine. First shown to the public in , the Pontiac Aztek concept car was well.

    “Complete Acquiesence”: Bob Lutz Reveals How the Pontiac Aztek Happened [ UPDATE: The Aztek concept car was a much leaner vehicle. auto show was merely the production design customized with attractive wheels.

    The concept car concept is translated as "the idea of a car". This is a kind of prototype car, which tests people's reactions to new technologies being introduced, design solutions, etc. In its original form, prototypes are never launched into mass production.

    Pontiac aztek concept vs. production

    Pontiac aztek concept vs. production

    Pricing of the Aztek was also an issue at launch: You do it best by having a dictator. Visitor statistics Visitors Now users: Pontiac vehicles Pontiac concept vehicles Cars introduced in s automobiles Crossover sport utility vehicles Mid-size sport utility vehicles Front-wheel-drive vehicles All-wheel-drive vehicles. This page was last edited on 5 September , at

    Pontiac aztek concept vs. production

    Pontiac aztek concept vs. production

    Pontiac aztek concept vs. production

    Pontiac aztek concept vs. production

    Pontiac aztek concept vs. production

    10 concept cars that got lost in translation (photos) - Page 3 - Roadshow

    In a recent interview , Don Norman warns of the perils of design by committee: You don't do good software design by committee. You do it best by having a dictator. From the user's point of view, you must have a coherent design philosophy, and I don't see how that could come about from open source software. The person who's done it best is Steve Jobs, and he's well-known for being a tyrant. Nowhere are those perils illustrated better than in this cautionary tale from General Motors: In the mids, then-General Motors Corp.

    And what the people wanted was sexy, edgy and a bit off-key; in short, a head-turner. General Motors' culture took over from there. Design would be by committee, the focus groups extensive. And production would have to stick to a tight budget, with all that sex appeal packed onto an existing minivan platform.

    Pontiac aztek concept vs. production

    The result rolled off the assembly line in What's worse, the Aztek was actually a good idea at the right time. It was killed by poor execution: The Aztek represented all that is wrong with GM's design process, that official said.

    The concept car actually did something few GM designs do: And GM had high hopes to sell 50, to 70, Azteks a year, establishing Pontiac on the cutting edge. Then came production, the executive said. The penny-pinchers demanded that costs be kept low by putting the concept car on an existing minivan platform. That destroyed the original proportions and produced the vehicle's bizarre, pushed-up back end.

    Pontiac aztek concept vs. production

    But the designers kept telling themselves it was good enough. Sales never reached the 30, level needed to make money on the Aztek, so it abruptly went out of production last year. The Pontiac Aztek is such an egregious case of compromised design that it is referenced multiple times in Steve McConnell's Code Complete 2: Maybe you think the Pontiac Aztek was the greatest car ever made, belong to the Flat Earth Society, and make a pilgrimage to the alien landing site at Roswell, New Mexico, every four years.

    If you do, go ahead and believe that requirements won't change on your projects. I was intrigued by the number of times the Aztek was referenced in the book-- three times is not a coincidence. And at least one international reader was a little miffed since he had no idea what the Pontiac Aztek was: Another thing I didn't appreciate is the use of a few American comparisons and references.

    I presume the book is written for an international audience, in which case such culture-specific idioms should be avoided. The Pontiac Aztek is featured quite prominently never having seen one, nor being aware of its reputation, I have no idea whether the choice for that particular car has any meaning, be it positive or negative.

    Pontiac aztek concept vs. production

    I also remember at least one reference to some sports terminology which is obsure to most non-Americans, probably baseball-related. The Aztek is uniquely American. And too often, so is the least common denominator result of design by committee.

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